Life of Pi

This is not a movie review.

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Picture Courtesy: Guardian UK

I watched the movie yesterday with a few friends, despite all warnings from reviewers  about how it won’t touch your heart and so on…Sure it was slow, you can clearly tell this one hasn’t been made by an Indian, Irrfan Khan’s supposed Canadian accent and Tabu’s Tamil make you cringe. Then there is the “we are in the land of spirituality, mystique and elephants” perspective that Ang Lee brings of India.  I know it’s not the film maker’s fault that he was working with a fantasy story, but I am tired of India not being shown like it actually is.  Both Slum Dog Millionaire and Life of Pi have such stereotypical-looking characters and imagery. When I saw the darkened and emaciated Suraj Sharma in the movie, I couldn’t help get angry about it in my head. But I digress, the point I was making was that yes there is a whole lot that I didn’t like in the movie, but surprisingly I wasn’t bored. Yeah sure some of the visuals are stunning. But I have never been a swayed by stunning visuals or great graphics (my reason for not watching Avatar so far). What kept me hooked was the tiger, Richard Parker. And although the conversation in the movie begins with a promise that this story will make you believe in god, what it did leave me with was something else. I was looking forward to be swayed into turning a believer from the skeptic that I am, but that didn’t happen. I should know better not to expect that from a movie.

I loved every frame that Richard Parker was in, and when in the end he leaves without as much as turning around to bid goodbye, I quietly shed a few tears for Pi behind my 3D glasses.

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Picture Courtesy: cinema.theiapolis.com

I guess leaving without saying good bye is tough to handle and Irrfan Khan does a terrific job of giving you a lump in the throat when he relives that pain in the movie. The movie made me realize that human beings are the only species who feel so much emotion. While it makes us different from animals, superior too most times, it also leaves us very vulnerable. The attachment.

 

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